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THE PURPLE BOOK (More to come...)

Foreword - YOUR IDEAS, OUR CITY

If there are two themes to our campaign, they are the importance of ideas and the importance of working together.

As people, we adapt to the environment we live in - in this case the city of Winnipeg.

 

With the right plan and the right design, we can change the city around us, and so too change ourselves.

The ideas and the people we need to build the city we want are out there. We just need to listen.

At the outset of the 2014 mayoral campaign, I said to the people of Winnipeg:  

 

'You give me hope. In the face of corruption, you continue to believe in honesty. In the face of exclusion, you continue to believe in the ideal of one city.'

 

Now in 2022 this is still the case. We continue to believe that we can be one city, united in common cause.

 

We are walking together into Winnipeg’s future.

 

We call on the people of Winnipeg to join us in making OUR CITY - SAFE, THRIVING & LIVABLE.

You can check out 'The Purple Book' from the 2014 campaign here.

Merci, Thank-you, Tapwe akwa khitwam.

Robert-Falcon Ouellette

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OUR CITY. Safe, Thriving & Livable

SAFE

Together Let's Build a Child Friendly Winnipeg

'To build the city we all want, children must be at the heart of its design.' - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

During the 2014 mayoral campaign, our first announcement was to make Winnipeg a ‘child-friendly city’. Based on an existing world-wide initiative supported by UNICEF and already adopted by other Canadian cities, a ‘child-friendly city’ is a city in which the voices, needs, priorities and rights of children and youth are an integral part of public policies, programs and decisions.

 

As in 2014, I stand firm on our commitment to build a ‘child-friendly city’ because every decision the city makes, every policy or by-law, ultimately impacts children and youth.

 

As Mayor we will place the well-being of children and youth at the center of the city’s decision-making process. This would include how best to support the parents, grandparents, caregivers, and elders who nurture and raise our children.

 

To build the city we all want, children must be at the heart of its design.

Read our full statement here.

Redefining Our Relationship With the Winnipeg Police Service

'Winnipeg is frustrated. We all want for more from the police and more of a say in the policing they do.' – Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

Winnipeg boasts some of the highest police spending per capita of any major Canadian city, with the 2021 Winnipeg Police Service (WPS) Budget exceeding $310 million and accounting for over 26% of the City of Winnipeg’s total budget.

 

However, ever-increasing WPS funding has had little impact on the crime Winnipeggers face day to day. Violent crime, property crime; all crimes are up year over year and have begun to top 5-year averages.

 

Winnipeg is frustrated. We all want for more from the police and more of a say in the policing they do.

Read our full statement here.

Prioritizing Paramedic Hiring & New Ambulances to Address Slow Response Times

Minutes count in a medical emergency. You want an ambulance as quickly as possible to take you where you need to go as soon as possible.’ - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

Winnipeg has seen ambulance response times to life-threatening emergencies grow and are now on average six minutes longer than the city's nine-minute response target. While response times by Fire-Paramedics do fall within the nine-minute target, they are unable to transport patients to hospitals.

 

Meeting the city’s response time target is important for patient outcomes. For heart attack, stroke and trauma patients, minutes count. You want an ambulance as quickly as possible, to take you where you need to go as soon as possible.

 

As Mayor, one of my priorities would be the hiring of paramedics and putting more ambulances on the road.

Read our full statement here.

Tackling the Addictions Crisis: Harm Reduction, Treatment & Support

‘There is a drug problem in Winnipeg that we must solve, and all options need to be on the table.’ - Robert-Falcon Ouellette.

 

Today we announced our plan to tackle one of the most pressing issues facing Winnipeg, the addictions crisis.

 

To build the city we all want, we need to address one of the root causes of crime and homelessness in our city. Let us have courage and talk about and really address addictions.

 

As a result of the addictions crisis, Winnipeg has seen a dramatic increase over the last three years in crime, overdoses and death due to drugs that has overwhelmed our paramedic & firefighter personnel and has tied up our police with countless calls. (1) (2)

 

Addictions affects every aspect of our city life. It makes us nervous to take the bus, makes us avoid certain areas of our city, and even makes us feel unsafe in our own backyards.

 

Addiction is a mental health illness and must be treated as a public health issue, not a criminal justice issue. Let’s be clear, in Winnipeg addictions is a public health emergency.

 

There is a drug problem in Winnipeg that we must solve, and all options need to be on the table. The city is at the forefront of this public health emergency and should take the lead to solve it and as Mayor I will work with community organizations, the province, the federal government, Indigenous governments, anyone to address this.

Please read our full statement here.

Tackling the Homelessness Crisis: Expanding Emergency, Transitional & Affordable Housing

‘If you want to say - you can’t sleep here – we must have somewhere safe for them to stay.’ - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

Today we announced that as your Mayor the city would fully support End Homelessness Winnipeg and would bring Winnipeg into the ‘Built For Zero’ group of communities whose goal is to end chronic and veteran homelessness, by expanding emergency, transitional and affordable housing.

 

Last April, through an ‘Interim Street Census’, End Homelessness Winnipeg found that there were 1127 Winnipeggers experiencing homeless. 

 

We see it in the bus shelters and the back lanes, our parks and riverbanks, homelessness is everywhere in our city. If you want to tell them - you can’t sleep here - we must have somewhere safe for them to stay.

 

To build the city we all want, we need the compassion and strength to address the homelessness crisis now, by expanding emergency shelters and adding transitional and affordable housing units.

Please read our full statement here.

THRIVING

Winnipeg 150 - The City We Love

‘We have an opportunity to come together to acknowledge, share and celebrate the rich history of Winnipeg.’ - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

Today we announced our commitment to celebrating Winnipeg 150, the 150th anniversary Winnipeg becoming a city, and if elected Mayor would set up a planning committee of community representatives at the earliest possible opportunity.

 

With Winnipeg 150 we have an opportunity to share the history of our land and city.

 

This would include the stories of the original Indigenous inhabitants, European settlers, the Metis People and of the those from around the world who choose Winnipeg to call home.

 

We have an opportunity to come together to acknowledge, share and celebrate the rich history of Winnipeg and we shouldn’t miss it.

Read our full statement here.

 

Restoring Public Trust in City Hall: Accountability, Integrity & Transparency

Today we announced and reaffirmed a host of measures designed to restore public trust in city hall. Measures that include exhausting all means available to hold accountable those responsible for the Winnipeg Police Service headquarters overruns, creating a strong leadership culture at City Hall, implementing ranked ballots for Mayoral elections and allowing council to elect the Executive Policy Committee (EPC). (1)

 

As your mayor I will work tirelessly to restore your trust in City Hall and the departments that serve you. And to city employees, as your Mayor I will work to make the city a great place to work and promise to protect you when you see wrongdoing and want to do what is right and report it.

Please read our full statement here.

Encouraging Redevelopment of Empty Lots & Downtown Surface Parking

‘These lots are a constant reminder that we need to do better. And we can. It's time to be creative and realise the full potential for the benefit of all Winnipeggers.' - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

Empty lots and downtown surface parking have become a barrier to growth and safety in our city. Too often, older buildings have been torn down to avoid needed repairs and to lower property tax bills, replaced by grass, gravel or asphalt.

 

These lots can sit stagnant and underdeveloped for years, costing the city much needed tax revenue, while creating economic dead zones and safety concerns for neighbours.

These lots provide an excellent redevelopment opportunity for the city that is efficient and affordable, since they are already close to, and supplied by, existing city services.

These lots are a constant reminder that we need to do better. And we can. It's time to be creative and realise the full potential for the benefit of all Winnipeggers.

Read our full statement here.

Let’s Complete the Study on Rail Relocation Cancelled by Province

'Do we want to keep spending money to work around the problem or to solve it?' - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

In 2014, as part of our Mayoral campaign, we proposed the study as an important part of a new vision for Winnipeg, which would see how rail relocation could enhance the City’s Transportation Master Plan and help positively redefine our city for the future. In 2016 the Province cancelled the study.

 

The study would explore two components:

  • First, a realistic cost estimate of moving most heavy rail traffic to new, modern yards and multimodal exchanges connected with air freight and trucking. This estimate would include social, economic and environmental benefits of not having to build major infrastructure projects to work around existing rail.

  • Second, enhancing the Transit Master Plan by moving routes off streets, and using existing rail and rail rights-of-way for Bus Rapid Transit lines or for a city-wide commuter rail network

 

Since making the commitment to look at rail relocation eight years ago, some $617-million has been spent on infrastructure dealing with rail lines.  As well, The cost of replacing the all-but-condemned Arlington Bridge has risen from $100-million to $330-million as a preliminary estimate. 

 

For anyone who has wanted better transit in Winnipeg, for commuters who get stuck waiting for freight trains, and for taxpayers who are paying the tab, we have an obligation to see whether we could be doing better.

 

A considerable amount of Winnipeg’s multi-billion dollar infrastructure deficit is tied up in overpasses, underpasses and replacing bridges around rail lines and railyards.

 

Do we want to keep spending money to work around the problem or to solve it?

Please read our full statement here.

Restoring Public Trust In City Hall With An Elected EPC

'Winnipeggers want to know they are being heard and that their coucncillors are workgin for them.' - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

After years of investigations, revelations of backroom deals and lawsuits related to City of Winnipeg land deals and awarded contracts, we need to restore the public trust in City Hall. And we can do this by having an elected executive policy committee (EPC).

 

Under the City of Winnipeg Charter Act, an EPC is established and councillors are appointed by the mayor with broad guidelines regarding its make up. Generally, it is made up of the chairs for the various departments at City Hall, like Property Planning & Development, and other appointments decided by the mayor.

 

In effect, an appointment of a councillor to EPC by the Mayor can act as a carrot or stick. Being part of the EPC means more pay for a councillor. Not doing what the mayor wants could mean removal.

 

This creates a de facto ruling bloc on council making up the majority vote, pushing councillors not on EPC to the side and leaving some Winnipeggers feeling like they’re not being heard.

Please read our full statement here.

LIVABLE

Safe, Clean, Convenient & Affordable: Making Transit Work for Everyone

 

‘That’s our goal - to deliver a transit experience that Winnipeg will prefer to driving.’ Robert-Falcon Ouellette.

 

As Mayor we will work with council, Winnipeg Transit and the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) to bring in a package of measures designed to make riding Winnipeg Transit safe, clean, convenient, and affordable – including strengthened security for buses, more buses on high demand routes, and ‘a-buck-a-ride’ fare.

 

For Winnipeg to work and to build the city we all want, we need a transit system that works. It has to get people from stop to stop safely, with the minimum cost and effort to them,

 

That’s our goal - to deliver a transit experience that Winnipeg will prefer to driving.

 

And getting people out of their cars is one of the best ways to reduce emissions and our carbon footprint, to make Winnipeg a Green City.

 

Read our full statement here.

 

 

Together Let's Build a Child Friendly Winnipeg

'To build the city we all want, children & youth must be at the heart of its design.' - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

 

During the 2014 mayoral campaign, our first announcement was to make Winnipeg a ‘child-friendly city’. Based on an existing world-wide initiative supported by UNICEF and already adopted by other Canadian cities, a ‘child-friendly city’ is a city in which the voices, needs, priorities and rights of children and youth are an integral part of public policies, programs and decisions.

 

As in 2014, I stand firm on our commitment to build a ‘child-friendly city’ because every decision the city makes, every policy or by-law, ultimately impacts children and youth.

 

As Mayor we will place the well-being of children and youth at the center of the city’s decision-making process. This would include how best to support the parents, grandparents, caregivers, and elders who nurture and raise our children.

 

To build the city we all want, children must be at the heart of its design.

Read our full statement here.

Tackling the Homelessness Crisis: Expanding Emergency, Transitional & Affordable Housing

‘If you want to say - you can’t sleep here – we must have somewhere safe for them to stay.’ - Robert-Falcon Ouellette

Today we announced that as your Mayor the city would fully support End Homelessness Winnipeg and would bring Winnipeg into the ‘Built For Zero’ group of communities whose goal is to end chronic and veteran homelessness, by expanding emergency, transitional and affordable housing.

 

Last April, through an ‘Interim Street Census’, End Homelessness Winnipeg found that there were 1127 Winnipeggers experiencing homeless. 

 

We see it in the bus shelters and the back lanes, our parks and riverbanks, homelessness is everywhere in our city. If you want to tell them - you can’t sleep here - we must have somewhere safe for them to stay.

 

To build the city we all want, we need the compassion and strength to address the homelessness crisis now, by expanding emergency shelters and adding transitional and affordable housing units.

Read our full statement here.

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